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Women in Sports Day 2012
“Title IX at 40: In it for the Long Run”

23rd Annual Event Luncheon
Presented by DWASF

2012 DWASF AWARDS

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DWASF Pioneer Award
Lucille Koon

The DWASF Pioneer Award honors a Delawarean who has provided a lifetime contribution towards the advancement of opportunities for girls and women in sport. This contribution may have been as an athlete pioneer, role model, coach, umpire/official, administrator, scholar, trainer, journalist or outstanding supporter of womenís sport in a similar role. It may have been in a professional or volunteer capacity, in one or more sports over many years.

Photo of Lucille Koon, recipient of the DWASF Pioneer AwardI was born and raised in North Carolina, where I played the only two sports in high school offered for girls: basketball and softball. I was captain of the basketball team for two years and both years we went to the state tournament (out of 100 counties). I was on the county–wide all–star team for two years and the all–star team captain my senior year (1952); I was also voted most valuable all–star player for both years. In addition to my sports pursuits in high school, I was inducted into the National Honor Society and sang in the school choir.

For college, I attended Appalachian State Teachers College in Boone, N.C. where I majored in physical education and minored in science. Although there were no intercollegiate sports for women at that time, I was very active in sports through my physical education major and I earned my "A" club letter during my sophomore year. I was active in the synchronized swimming club and was president my senior year (1956). During the summers, I was employed by my hometown as its first female lifeguard and one summer I attended the American Red Cross National Aquatics School.

Upon graduating from college, I taught for two years at Wilson Jr. High School in Mecklenburg County, N.C., where I coached both the basketball and softball teams. During this time I also played basketball for one of the toughest recreation leagues in the country and I averaged 29 points per game and scored my personal best of 52 points in one game.

I then coached two years at Cary High School with much success, bringing a losing team to second in the district during my second year as coach. During the summers I continued to work in recreation and swimming. At this time, I applied for and received a teaching scholarship in the graduate program at Appalachian University. There I taught swimming and volleyball to freshmen. In 1961, I received my Master of Arts degree in Physical Education and Guidance.

A personnel director from Milford High School was recruiting at Appalachian University and talked me into visiting Milford, Delaware. I did so and liked it very much. (It didn't seem too Yankee). I accepted a position at Milford and I coached field hockey, basketball, and softball. During only my second year as coach, my teams lost only two games in all three sports combined, going undefeated in basketball. Too bad there were no state tournaments for women in Delaware at that time! That summer, I taught six of my students Lifesaving at the Shawnee Country Club. The club donated the pool and I donated my time. All the girls who have played for me throughout the years were great, but I remember those first years at Milford with special fondness. One of my players from that time was Mary Ann Hitchens, one of the first girls to score 1000 points in basketball and who later coached at the University of Delaware and became the womenís athletic director there.

In 1963 I left Milford to become an assistant professor at Wesley College in Dover. I taught a variety of physical education courses and conducted intramural sports as there had been no collegiate sports for women at Wesley since WWII. Due to my players' interest, we began playing several colleges in field hockey on a trial basis. Within two years we had a schedule, a budget, and a new coach. In basketball, we played in the Camden–Wyoming recreation league and I got to be a player-coach. We did so well that we got a budget from Wesley to play other colleges. At this time, my teaching load was so heavy that I could not continue both college-level coaching and teaching. I had young children at the time so I chose teaching; we hired new coaches. One of those new coaches that we hired was Joyce Starkey Perry, who was very successful at Wesley and went on to coach at the University of Delaware.

I organized a synchronized swimming team which gave performances twice a year to the college community. As a teacher, I was a Water Safety Instructor Trainer, teaching all swimming courses from beginner to Water Safety Instructor. The instructors, who were college students, did their practice teaching with the children of faculty and staff, essentially providing free swimming lessons to dozens of Doverís children. I volunteered to teach water rescue skills to the Dover Fire Company because of their close proximity to Silver Lake.

During my years at Wesley, I continued to participate in the community recreation leagues, both as a player and a coach in basketball and softball. In basketball, I played for the Carl King team and we even played in some tournaments in Washington, D.C. In softball, I played in the Smyrna league and took solely to coaching during the year I was on chemotherapy. That year we won the state tournament and went to the regionals in fast pitch. The next year, I coached a slow pitch team in lower Delaware and we won the state tournament in that category.

While serving as head of the Physical Education Department and chairperson of the Division of Social Science and Education at Wesley College, I was instrumental in starting the four year degree programs in Physical Education and Elementary Education. After 29 years, I retired as a professor from Wesley in 1992. That year I was awarded the DAHPERD (Delaware Association of Health, Physical Education & Recreation) professional honor award and I was granted the title of Professor Emeritus from Wesley. In 1999, I was inducted into The Wesley College Alumni Association Athletic Hall of Fame.

After retirement, I continued to participate for two years in the Senior Olympics in softball. I have an ongoing interest in women's sports and participate in golf. I belong to the DWGA (Delaware Women's Golf Association) and enjoy working with my granddaughter as she hones her competitive swimming skills.

~Presented in memory of Ethel McInerney Starr~
Mrs. Starr was a pioneer and champion for the cause of equity for young women in CYO sports.


DWASF Pioneer Award
Carol Timmons

The DWASF Pioneer Award honors a Delawarean who has provided a lifetime contribution towards the advancement of opportunities for girls and women in sport. This contribution may have been as an athlete pioneer, role model, coach, umpire/official, administrator, scholar, trainer, journalist or outstanding supporter of womenís sport in a similar role. It may have been in a professional or volunteer capacity, in one or more sports over many years.

Photo of Carol Timmons, recipient of the DWASF Pioneer AwardBrigadier General Carol A. Timmons is the Director, Joint Staff, Delaware Joint Force Headquarters. She oversees joint operations for Delaware Army and Air National Guard on behalf of the Adjutant General on all matters concerning homeland security, homeland defense and defense support to civil authorities. In 1980, General Timmons earned her commission through Officer Candidate School at Fort Benning, Georgia, where she was an honor graduate. In 1981, she earned her Army pilot wings from Fort Rucker, Alabama and in 1984 she was awarded her Air Force pilot wings from Vance Air Force Base, Oklahoma. Prior to earning her commission, General Timmons served in the rank of airman basic as a Law Enforcement Apprentice for the Delaware Air National Guardís 166th Security Forces Squadron. General Timmons is a veteran of numerous contingencies to include Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Southern Watch, Joint Guard, Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. Her deployed command experience includes 774th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron Commander and 455th Deputy Operations Group Commander. In 1984, she attended Wilmington University and obtained a Bachelor of Science in Business Management, and in 2001 she attended Air War College and earned a certificate in Correspondence. Her assignments are as follows:

  1. August 1980 – August 1984, Section Leader/Pilot, UH-1, Company B, 150th Combat Aviation Brigade, Delaware Army National Guard, New Castle, Delaware
  2. August 1984 – November 1984, Student, Undergraduate Pilot Training, 82nd Student Squadron, Williams Air Force Base, Arizona
  3. November 1984 – November 1985, Student, Undergraduate Pilot Training, 71st Flying Training Wing, Vance Air Force Base, Oklahoma
  4.  November 1985 – April 1986, Pilot, Initial Qualification Training, 443rd Military Airlift Wing, Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma
  5.  April 1986 – December 1988, Pilot Transport, 335rd Military Airlift Squadron, McGuire Air Force Base, New Jersey
  6. December 1988 – June 1991, First Pilot, 335rd Military Airlift Squadron, McGuire Air Force Base, New Jersey
  7. June 1991 – June 1992, Co-Pilot, C-130H, 142nd Airlift Squadron, New Castle County Airport, New Castle, Delaware
  8. June 1992 – August 1994, Aircraft Commander, C-130H, 142nd Airlift Squadron, New Castle County Airport, New Castle, Delaware
  9. August 1994 – December 1997, Current Operations Officer, 166th Operations Support Flight, New Castle County Airport, New Castle, Delaware
  10. December 1997 – December 1999, Pilot/Flight Leader, 142d Airlift Squadron, New Castle County Airport, New Castle, Delaware
  11. December 1999 – January 2002, Assistant Chief Pilot, 142nd Airlift Squadron, New Castle County Airport, New Castle, Delaware
  12. January 2002 – May 2005, Assistant Operations Officer, 142nd Airlift Squadron, New Castle County Airport, New Castle, Delaware
  13.  May 2005 – March 2007, Commander, 142nd Airlift Squadron, New Castle County Airport, New Castle, Delaware
  14.  March 2007 – February 2009, Commander, 166th Operations Group, New Castle County Airport, New Castle, Delaware
  15. February 2009 – August 2010, Director of Operations, Headquarters, Delaware Air National Guard, New Castle County Airport, New Castle, Delaware
  16. August 2010 – Present, Director, Joint Staff, Delaware Joint Force Headquarters, New Castle County Airport, New Castle, Delaware

Brigadier General Timmons' Flight Rating is Command Pilot with more than 5,200 hours of flying in C–130H, C–141, and UH–1 aircrafts. She has earned her pilot wings from: Fort Rucker in Alabama and Vance Air Force Base in Oklahoma. She has earned the following awards and decorations:

Bronze Star; Meritorious Service Medal (with 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster); Air Medal (with 4 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters);Aerial Achievement Medal (with 2 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters); Air Force Commendation Medal; Army Commendation Medal; Air Force Outstanding Unit Award (with Valor Device and 3 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters); Air Force Organizational Excellence Award; Combat Readiness Medal (with 1 Silver and 3 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters); Army Reserve Component Achievement Medal; National Defense Service Medal (with 1 Bronze Service Star); Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (with 1 Bronze Service Star); Southwest Asia Service Medal (with 3 Bronze Service Stars);Afghanistan Campaign Medal (with 2 Bronze Service Stars); Iraq Campaign Medal (with 2 Bronze Service Stars); Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal; Global War on Terrorism Service Medal; Armed Forces Service Medal; Humanitarian Service Medal (with One Bronze Service Star);Air Force Overseas Ribbon (Short Tour) (with 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster); Air Force Expeditionary Service Ribbon (with Gold Border and 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster);Air Force Longevity Service (with 1 Silver Oak Leaf Cluster);Armed Forces Reserve Medal (with Silver Hourglass and M Device); Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon (with 1 Bronze Star); Air Force Training Ribbon (with One Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster);Army Service Ribbon North Atlantic Treaty Organization Medal; Kuwait Liberation Medal Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Kuwait Liberation Medal Government of Kuwait; Delaware National Guard Medal for Military Merit (with Bronze Numeral 2); Delaware National Guard Medal; Delaware National Guard National Defense Service Ribbon; Delaware National Guard Medal for Service in Aid to Civil Authority; Delaware National Guard Physical Fitness Ribbon (with Bronze Numeral 3);and Mississippi Emergency Service Medal

Brigadier General Timmons' Civilian Occupation includes being a First Officer on the B–767–757 with United Airlines with over 10,000 hours of total flying time. Her professional memberships and affiliations include the National Guard Association of the United States Lifetime Member; Air Force Association Member; Association of the United States Army Member; Military Officers Association of America Member; and the Veterans of Foreign Wars Lifetime Member. Her other achievements include being inducted into the Delaware Women's Hall of Fame in 2004 and into the Aviation Hall of Fame in 2007.

~Presented in memory of Ethel McInerney Starr~
Mrs. Starr was a pioneer and champion for the cause of equity for young women in CYO sports.


DWASF Senior Sportswoman
Brenda Ferris

The DWASF Senior Sportswoman Award honors a Delaware active female athlete, 50 years or over, for exceptional accomplishments in athletics, leadership and community service in any sport.

Photo of Brenda Ferris, recipient of the DWASF Senior Sportsmanship AwardBrenda Becker Ferris is a New Castle, Delaware native, an All–State selection in field hockey and softball at William Penn High and an inductee in the West Chester University Athletic Hall of Fame. In Brenda's four-year collegiate career, her Golden Rams field hockey teams won three of the school's four AIAW national championships. As a senior midfielder, she was named an All-American and received the Broderick Award as the nation's best field hockey player. Ferris was a top–ten finalist for the best collegiate female athlete in the U.S.

During the 1978–79 academic year, Brenda pulled off an improbable national championship double, leading West Chester to the first–-ever NCAA title in the sport of women's lacrosse. This accomplishment catapulted Ferris into the national and international spotlight. She was selected as the youngest member of the U.S. Field Hockey Team. That team qualified for the 1980 Olympics, but America boycotted the Games that year. However, the team finished fourth in World Cup competition.

Brenda then captained the first U.S. “Under 21 team” that beat Canada in international play. She was a three–time field hockey participant at the National Sports Festival, where her squad won a gold medal. Brenda remains a prominent figure in Delaware sports. She has played on at least 15 championship teams in softball, flag football and field hockey with two Diamond State Games field hockey titles to her credit. In 2005, her Coed League softball team won a national championship. Brenda currently coaches women's field hockey at Tatnall School until 2009.


DWASF Senior Sportswoman
JoAnn Szczepkowski

The DWASF Senior Sportswoman Award honors a Delaware active female athlete, 50 years or over, for exceptional accomplishments in athletics, leadership and community service in any sport.

Photo of JoAnn Szczepkowski, recipient of the DWASF Senior Sportsmanship AwardI was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania in l946. I went to school before Title IX, so there were few opportunities for girls to be involved in sports in the schools or the community. However, it was at a time when children spent much time outdoors. I enjoyed biking, skating, playing games of tag in the neighborhood and exploring the nearby woods. Therefore, I developed a love of the outdoors, so it was only natural that when I felt I needed to begin to exercise, running was a good fit. I was in my late 30's, had two young children and often felt tired. My husband was running and really enjoyed it, so I began slowly, but soon got to feel the health benefits and started to enjoy getting out to run.

From the time I started running I began to realize the many health benefits such as increased energy, a stronger immune system, weight loss, and stress release. Over the years it's been wonderful meeting so many people through running. Running with family and friends is really special. Running gets one outdoors in all sorts of weather, which I have grown to enjoy. Building fitness through exercise, such as running, increases confidence.

I was teaching at the time I began running and fit running in on weekends and in the summers. I ran only two or three races a year then. It wasn't until I started spending summers at the beach eight years ago that I really got interested in racing. The Seashore Striders in Rehoboth Beach and Seven Sisters Summer Series in Dewey Beach were responsible for that as they made running and racing a lot of fun.

I now hold seven Delaware resident age–group records in the 65–-69 age group from the 5K to the Marathon. I attribute the success I've had in running as I've gotten older to my vegan diet. Over the years I've gone from the standard American diet to an increasingly healthy diet. I became a vegetarian 20 years ago and then 10 years ago went vegan. I've now added more raw fruits and vegetables to my diet and have eliminated refined sugar. I've come to find the following quote to be true, “Give your body what it needs, not what it wants, and it will come to want what it needs.”

My motivation to run well is to be an inspiration to my family, friends, and anyone who will listen to adopt a whole foods vegan diet and to find an enjoyable way to exercise. I strongly believe this lifestyle creates vibrant health. I believe one can maintain health and vigor even as one gets older through vigorous exercise and a whole-foods, plant-based diet.


DWASF Wilma Rudolph Courage Award
Lisa Sullivan

Photo of Lisa Sullivan, recipient of the DWASF Wilma Rudolph Courage Award
Tomir Gibbs of Mount Pleasant, left, with coach Lisa Sullivan.
(Photo by Jon Buzby)

The DWASF Wilma Rudolph Courage Award honors a Delaware female athlete of any age who has overcome adversity and demonstrated extraordinary courage in athletic performance. Criteria also include the ability to overcome adversity through persistence and determination and possession of qualities consistent with the ideals of ethical conduct in sports.

Lisa Sullivan attended Mount Pleasant High School where she played basketball and softball. She graduated in 1984 and attended Wilmington College where she once again played basketball. She graduated in 1992 with a Bachelor of Arts in Behavioral Science. From 1990 to 1993, she was the Woman's Assistant Basketball Coach. During the 1992 and 1993 seasons, she helped coach a team that qualified for the NAIA National Championship.

During 1992–1993, she began her high school coaching career as the Girls Varsity Basketball Coach at Concord High School, where she coached a quarterfinal game. During 1994–1996, she was the Girls Varsity Basketball Coach at Sanford School, where she and her team won conference title in 1996. She also coached in a semifinal game at the Bob Carpenter Center and became the first woman to coach her team at the “Bob.”

In 1998, she began coaching boys' teams. She was the Mount Pleasant High School Junior Varsity Boys Basketball Coach for 10 years. She also became the Boys/Girls Assistant Track Coach at Mount in 2001 and continues today. Lisa also served as the Girls Assistant Volleyball at Mount in 2010–2011.

In 2008 she was named head Coach for the Varsity Boys Basketball team and became the first female to coach a boys basketball team in Delaware. This past year, her team qualified for the state tournament for the first time in 13 years. The quarterfinal game at the Bob Carpenter Center was the first time a Mount team has played at the “Bob.” She finished the season 16–7.

Lisa used her degree from Wilmington University to become a Career Placement Advisor for Jobs for Delaware Graduates, a job she has held since 1999. She also became a Behavioral Interventionist at New Behavior Network in 2008 and continues this work today.

About 15 years ago, Lisa was diagnosed with a rare nerve disorder known as Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy after a toe–stubbing incident while getting out of an elevator. She has not been able to use her left foot and instead of worrying and letting it get her down, Lisa has not missed a beat. With the help of a cart for her foot, she has rolled through the Delaware sports history books, and she is not finished yet!

~In Memory of Rita Rosaio, daughter of long-time DWASF Board Member, Denise Rosaio~


High School Awards

Outstanding Female Athletes Athlete of Promise
A. I. duPont
Madeline McCormick
Stephanie Davis
Brandywine
Molly Read McPheeters
Maria DiCristofaro
Caesar Rodney
Taylor Prillaman
Rebekah Mills
Christiana
Khashema Boyer
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Concord
Gayle Tadler
Emily Panchak
Delmarva Christian
Sarah Bryan
Taylor Phillips
Hodgson Vo-Tech
Kenya McVey
Sarah Deprisco
Indian River
Grace Cummings
Karlie Smith
Lake Forest
Kelsey Smith
Gabrielle Cubbage
McKean
Shayna Perez
Alexis Newton
Newark
Allison Alexander
Sarah Braatz
Polytech
Jaynie Deputy
Alyssa Jacobs
St. Elizabeth's
Katherine Glunt
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St. Mark's
Taryn Schweizer
Claudia Seemans
William Penn
Marissa Robinson
Chardonnay Hope

2012 Scholarship Recipients

The DWASF/Dr. Michael Axe/First State Orthopedics Scholarship is awarded to a college–-bound, female high school senior athlete who participates in at least one varsity sport who has a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better, and who possesses leadership and sportsmanship, and who is skillful in her sport. This $500 award is given to one Northern Delaware athlete and one Southern Delaware athlete.

  • Northern Delaware: Allison Alexander – Newark High School
  • Southern Delaware: Taylor Prillaman – Caesar Rodney High School